Rory McIlroy: My Game-Changing Tips More-Golf Like a Pro
Jan26

Rory McIlroy: My Game-Changing Tips More-Golf Like a Pro

Angus Murray Rory McIlroy and coach Michael Bannon. I didn’t have a great 2013. This year? I’m back to playing like a World No. 1 should, with a shiny new Claret Jug and a Wanamaker Trophy to prove it. Credit goes to my longtime coach, Michael Bannon, who reacquainted me with five key moves I had strayed from in recent years. Use my fixes to transform your move into a championship swing. Michael Bannon is the only coach I’ve ever had. It’s scary — he knows my swing better than I do. So when things started sliding south 18 months ago, he knew exactly what to do: Get back to the basics that rocketed me to No. 1 in the first place, using check points and feels that Michael taught me when I was a little kid. Now my driver, iron and wedge swings are again on autopilot. My performance stats are about the same as last year, but I can sense a difference. Every shot feels flush. Copy my fixes and you, too, can rediscover your best swing.     Angus Murray Game Changer No. 1 “Activate” Your Address Position To crush it, you need a comfortable stance. Simply tilt from your hips while flexing your knees. You’d think I’d be able to get into a solid address position without thinking, considering the tens of thousands of swings I’ve made in my lifetime. The truth is that it’s as easy to fall into bad habits here as it is in any other part of your swing. So I work on my address every time I practice. The Key: Settle in so that your arms hang freely and are far enough in front of you to whip the club through the impact zone without your body getting in the way.     Angus Murray Game Changer No. 2 Steal My One-Piece Takeaway Stop slices and hooks by simply ‘pushing” the club straight back The first two feet of my swing are critical. If I start the club back on plane, I won’t have to reroute it on the way down, so I can just rip it without fearing a mis-hit. Granted, my takeaway isn’t perfect. I occasionally yank the club too far inside [then come over the top in the downswing], or “lift” it up and out [which gets me “trapped” coming down]. But I can fix those flaws. The Key: “Push” the club straight back. Picture a wall running parallel to your toe line and straight up through your hands [above]. As you start your swing, keep your hands and the clubhead on the wall.     Angus...

Read More